Children’s Book Week

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May 1st marked the start of the 98th annual Children’s Book Week. To commemorate this week that encourages children’s literacy, I’ve put together a list of some my family’s favorite books. Libraries and bookstores across America celebrate this special week, and you can check out events in your area with this interactive map.

Ella Bella Ballerina Series. Ella Bella is a young ballet dancer who is transported by music into the story of well-known ballets such as Sleeping Beauty, The Nutcracker, Cinderella, and a few others. The illustrations are beautiful. My daughter, an aspiring ballerina, loves these books, and even my 6-year-old boy enjoys the stories.

 

Dinosaurs Before Dark (Magic Tree House Book 1) by [Osborne, Mary Pope, Sal Murdocca]Magic Tree House Series. You will never run out of books to read with this series. And since the author transports her hero and heroine, Jack and Annie, into books via the tree house, she has an endless supply of writing material. I enjoy this series almost as much as my kids. In the first book, Jack and Annie stumble upon the tree house, and, by accident, end up transported to the age of dinosaurs.

 

A Giraffe and a Half. My kids love reading this tongue twister by Shel Silverstein. It features Silverstein’s always fun and humorous illustrations.

 

 

Tacky the Penguin series. Tacky is an unconventional, Hawaiian-shirt-wearing penguin who gets into trouble and then out of it again by hilarious means. Our favorite is Tacky Goes to Camp, where Tacky and his penguin friends nearly get eaten by a bear but are inadvertently saved by Tacky’s love of s’mores.

 

Henry’s Bright Idea. This story follows a group of sharply dressed, creative animals. Henry the fox is the inventor of the group, but he has lost his latest idea. His friend Eleanor the Bear helps him find his idea. This is a very sweet story, and the book is filled with delightful illustrations.

 

William and the Missing Masterpiece. The quick-witted cat-sleuth William is called to Paris to catch a thief who has stole the Mona Cheesa. The cheese puns alone in this book make it worth reading.

 

 

 

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